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"Adventures of the Book: From the Clay Tablet and the Papyrus Scroll to the Cyberbook." UC Davis Honors Program seminar.
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Book History Select Bibliography

Book History: Select Bibliography

 

Anderson, Benedict.  Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism.  Rev. ed. London: Verso, 2006. 1st ed. London: Verso, 1983.

 Bellanger, Claude, et.al., eds. Histoire generale de la presse francaise. 5 vols. Paris, Presses Universitaires de France, 1969-

Chartier, Roger. Forms and meanings: texts, performances, and audiences from codex to computer.  Philadelphia PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. vii, 144 p

 ----------Frenchness in the History of the Book: From the History of  Publishing to the History of Reading. American Antiquarian Society , 1988.

 Darnton, Robert. The Case for Books: Past, Present, and Future. PublicAffairs [Rpt ed] 2010.

 ----------“What is the history of books?” Daedalus , Vol. 111, No. 3, Representations and Realities (Summer, 1982), pp. 65-83

 ----------“What is the history of books? Revisited” (2007). Modern Intellectual History 4(3): 495-508.

Eisenstein, Elizabeth. The Printing Press as an Agent of Change: Communications and Cultural Transformations in Early Modern Europe. 2 vols.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1979.


----------The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009 [1983]. 

Febvre, Lucien and Henri-Jean Martin. L'Apparition du LIvre. Paris: Albin Michel, 1971 [1958]. Eng trans. David Gerard, The Coming of the Book: The

Impact of Printing, 1450-1800.  London: Verso, 2010 [1976].

 

 Finkelstein, David and Alastair McCleery, eds. Book History Reader.  New York and London:  Routledge, 2004.

----------An Introduction to Book History. New York and London: Routledge, 2005.

 Ehrman, Bart. Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why. HarperSanFrancisco, 2005. “The Beginnings of Christian Scripture,”

Pp. 17-43“; “The Copyists of the Early Chrisitan Writings,” 45-69; “Changing Scripture: Scribes, Authors, and Readers,” pp. 207-218.

 Genette, Gerard. Seuils. Paris: Seuil, 1987.

 Goldmann, Lucien. Towards a Sociology of the Novel. Tr. Alan Sheridan. London: Tavistock, 1975.

 Goody,.Jack. “Introduction.”  In Jack Goody, ed.  Literacy in traditional Societies. Cambridge at the University Press, 1968. Pp. 1-24.

----------The Logic of Writing and the Organization of Society. Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1986. Shields

Goody, Jack and Ian Watt. “The Consequences of Literacy.” Literacy in traditional Societies. Cambridge at the University Press, 1968. Pp. 27-68.

 Grafton, Anthony. The Footnote: A History. Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1997

Johns, Adrian. “Printing as a Medium.” International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Ed. Neil J. Smelser and Paul B. Baltes. Amsterdam:

Elsevier, 2001. Vol. 18. Pp. 12050-12055.

 ----------“Science and the Book in Modern Cultural Historiography.” Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science 29,2 (1998): 167-194. [See pdf in E:\Mike's Current Files\Current Reading\BookHistory]

Lanham, Richard A. “An Alphabet that Thinks”. The Economics of {Attention}: Style and Substance in the Age of Information. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006. pp. 79-129

 ----------“What’s Next for Text?” The Economics of {Attention}: Style and Substance in the Age of Information Pp. 130-156.

Lyons, Martyn. Books: A Living History. Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.

 

McArthur, Tom. Worlds of Reference. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. Shields Library AE1 .M33 1986. Shields Library AE1 .M33 1986

McLuhan, Marshall.  Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1964. “The Spoken Word,” pp. 77-80; “The Written Word,” pp. 81-88; “Roads and Paper Routes,” pp. 89-105; “The Print,” pp. 157-163; “Comics,” pp. 164-169; “The Printed Word: Architect of Nationalism,” pp. 170-178.

O’Donnell, James J. Avatars of the Word: From Papyrus to Cyberspace. Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1998.

 

Palmieri, Frank. “The Satiric Footnotes of Swift and Gibbon.” The Eighteenth Century 51,5 (1990): 245-262.

Parkes, M.B. Pause and Effect: An Introduction to the History of Punctuation in the West. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993.

 

Roberts, Colin H. and T.C. Skeat. Birth of the Codex. London : published for the British Academy by the Oxford University Press, c1983.

Schelsky, Helmut. “Das Lexikon: ein Instrument des modernen Bewusstseins.” Bertelsmann-Briefe 47 (September 1966): 6-11.

Snyder, Gary, “The Forest in the Library.” A Place in Space: Ethics, Aesthetics, and Watersheds. Washington DC: Counterpoint, 1995. Pp. 199-204.

Thompson, James Westfall. Ancient Libraries. Berkeley CA: University of California Press, 1940. Some material near beginning, and pp. 73-

Winchester, Simon. The Meaning Everything: The Story of the Oxford English Dictionary. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

 ----------The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insantiy, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary. New York: Harper Collins, 1998.Issued in the United Kindgom  under the title, The Surgeon of Crowthorne: A Tale of Murder, Madness, and the Love of Words. London: Viking, 1998.

 

Winter, Michael F. “The Book as Site of Rational Action: Weberian Perspectives on Writing, Printing, and the Crystallization of Reason.”  [Slide presentation]

 

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