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Last Updated: Apr 3, 2017 URL: http://guides.lib.ucdavis.edu/ebooks Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

Citing Ebooks Print Page
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Guidelines

This page includes guidelines on citing ebooks in MLA and APA style.

In addition to the components you normally include when you cite a book, if you use an ebook, it's important to include details about format and access.

For more extensive information about citing sources, please see our Citation Guide.

MLA Style

 Works Cited            

Format: Author Last name, First name. Title. Place of publication: Publisher, Year. Publication medium.

More Information:

  • The publication medium refers to the type of file, e.g. EPUB file, HTML file, PDF file, Kindle file. If you do not know the filetype, use the designation Digital file.
  • Example: Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Scribner's, 1918. PDF file.

 Parenthetical (In-Text) Citations

Format: Include the author's name in the signal phrase of your sentence, or within the parenthetical reference. If the ebook has chapters, indicate the chapter number abbreviated ch; if the file is a PDF with fixed pages, cite a page number instead. 

More Information:

  • Your e-reader may have its own location number system. Do not include this type of number in your citation.
  • Examples:

Jane Austen describes Mrs. Bennet as "a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper" (ch. 1).

Mrs. Bennet was "a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper" (Austen, ch. 1).

Jane Austen describes Mrs. Bennet as "a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper" (4).

Mrs. Bennet was "a women of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper" (Austen 4).

APA Style

 References

Format: Retrieved with an e-reader from a website or via a doi (digital object identifier):

Author Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year). Title. [E-reader]. Retrieved from URL

OR

Author Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year). Title. [E-reader]. doi:xxx

More Information:

  • If you access a title through an online collection,  e.g. HathiTrust, ebrary, Springer, without an e-reader do not include [E-reader] in your citation.
  • Examples:

Dewey, J. (1910). How we think. [Kindle Fire HD]. Retrieved from http://www.gutenberg.org/

Hyland, T. (2011). Mindfulness and learning. [Nook HD]. doi:10.1007/978-94-007-1911-8

Colvin, S.S. (1914). The learning process. Retrieved from http://www.hathitrust.org/

Hopkins, K.R. (2010). Teaching how to learn in a a what-to-learn culture. doi:10.1002/9781118269435

 

 In-Text Citations

Format: Follow APA's (author, date) method for paraphrased content. If you use a direct quotation, include a page number; if a page number is lacking, use a paragraph number (para.) or a section heading plus paragraph.

More Information:

  • Your e-reader may have its own location number system. Do not include this type of number in your citation.
  • Examples:

Dewey (1910) explores various dimensions of human thought.

"No words are oftener on our lips than thinking and thought" (Dewey, 1910, p.2).

Dewey (1910) asserts that "For the great majority of men under ordinary circumstances, the practical exigencies of life are almost, if not quite, coercive" (Chapter 10, para. 7).

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